Ceratium

Grow fingers to catch more light

Like other protists, ceratium transforms the sun’s energy into food through photosynthesis, using chloroplasts to make sugars.

In this episode

  • dinoflagelle
    DinoflagellatePyrocystis elegans
  • diatomee
    Centric diatom
  • acanthaire_lithoptera
    AcantharianLithoptera mulleri
  • radiolaires
    RadiolarianAulacantha scolymantha
  • colozum
    RadiolarianCollozum inerme

Narration

Ceratium ranipes belongs to the large family of dinoflagellates— single-celled protists equipped with two propelling flagella. Its unique shape is easily recognizable. Like other protists, ceratium transforms the sun’s energy into food through photosynthesis, using chloroplasts to make sugars.

Chloroplasts are microscopic, solar-powered factories containing chlorophyll, a green pigment that captures sunlight. The cell and its chloroplasts produce oxygen and convert carbon dioxide into organic compounds.

Ceratium are highly adaptable. At dawn, they grow fingers packed with chloroplasts to capture more light. When light vanishes, the fingers retract. This unique feature allows ceratium to sink in the dark or float to the surface to catch more light.

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Production
CNRS

Original Idea
Christian Sardet

Director
Sharif Mirshak

Scientific consultant
John Dolan

Texts
Christian Sardet

Images
Christian Sardet, Sharif Mirshak, Noé Sardet

Editing
Sharif Mirshak

Sound mix
Sharif Mirshak

Voice
Gregory Gallagher

Sound Engineer
Sharif Mirshak

Creative Commons Licence :
Attribution Non-Commercial
No Derivative

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